Everything you need to know about Siberian Huskies

January 22, 2020

Everything you need to know about Siberian Huskies

 

Adopting a Siberian Husky is a major commitment. If you’re not willing to be consistent with the way you care for them, then it’s best you find a lower maintenance breed such as Dachshund. Sure, in terms of grooming they’re alright. But how about the energy levels and amount of exercise they need? Siberian Huskies aren’t for the weak. They’re loving but powerful breeds that will challenge you any chance that they get. But once they form a bond with you, they will be your forever best friend.

 

Size — A full grown male Husky is 21-24 inches tall and 45 – 60 lbs. A full grown female Husky is slightly smaller, 20 – 22 inches tall and weighs between 35 – 50 lbs.

Breed Characteristics — Huskies are a working breed that are agile and light on their feet. Their thick, water resistant fur makes them great for the outdoors but unsuitable for hot climates. However, it is not recommended that you shave their fur off if you happen to live in a tropical area. Keep them inside with the air conditioner on instead. Huskies are nomadic; they can quickly adapt to new environments. They have an innate curiosity that can only be satisfied by their wandering tendencies. These tendencies make it extremely necessary to keep your husky on a leash. Huskies aren't scared of cars, and they don't have much of a homing instinct, leading to them either running away, getting lost or injured.

Temperament — Siberian Huskies are free-spirited and typically good with people. They are playful, athletic, and can take a little rough housing. Siberian Huskies are friendly and affectionate, making them the perfect companion for people of all ages.

Life span — Huskies can live anywhere between 12-15 years depending on how well you can take care of them. But studies have shown that if you spay your female Husky, it could help them live longer. So, get your pups fixed folks!

 

Siberian Husky’s love to cuddle

All dogs are cuddly but it’s a little more evident with Siberian Huskies. They are especially affectionate with family members, a.k.a. to them, their pack. Huskies thrive in a touchy environment because they like being the center of attention. An ideal day for a Husky would be having their owners feign over their every need for belly rubs and pats on the head. If you’re considering buying a husky, make sure that you have the luxury of time. They need plenty of human contact and interaction to stay healthy. Working a nine-to-five job doesn’t bode well with a husky but having another dog may help ease their boredom.

 

 

Every pack has its leader

You need to show your Husky who’s boss from a young age. Assert authority over them without being too aggressive. Huskies are stubborn dogs. They will do what they want to do when they want to do it. They’re not very eager to please, in fact, they give their owners attitude when told off. It is not uncommon for Huskies to challenge their position in the pack. Rebellion could come in the form of disobeying commands or deliberately breaking house rules that they’re accustomed to. Don’t give in to your dog’s bad behavior as you may have to deal with bigger problems in the future if you do.

 

Their predator instincts may kick in with smaller pets

It’s easy for Siberian Huskies to get along with other dogs. They will, however, assert their dominance and show the other dogs they’re the leader of the pack. But you need to watch out for your smaller pets because a Husky’s predatory instincts might kick in. Birds, rabbits, hamsters, and even fish in tanks could potentially end up in your Husky’s mouth. Don’t leave the little ones unattended and if possible, separate them while you’re away.

 

The cold never bothered them anyway

Siberian huskies are built to be resilient, and they can withstand temperatures as low as -60 degrees F (-51 degrees C). Working sled dogs often live outdoors in barns or insulated dog houses. Huskies are supremely adapted for the cold. For a start, there's their fur. It has a very soft, dense under layer which helps to insulate them (keep them warm), and then a coarse upper/overlayer (often called the guard hairs) which provide a second layer of insulation and partial waterproofing.

 

Huskies need their space

No, not a personal bubble (because they don’t have one). They need lots of physical space to run. Huskies have sudden bursts of energy that come out of nowhere and they can easily become hyperactive and start running around your house. There’s nothing wrong with not having a yard but putting a Husky in a studio apartment isn’t the best idea either. Families with large houses and sprawling yards are the perfect people to adopt Huskies! Combine the land area and tireless children, your Husky will feel at home in no time.

 

 

You need to learn to love running

Huskies have high endurance. They are energetic, resilient dogs that can run shockingly long distances with the right training. In fact, sled dogs can run up to 125 miles a day! That’s right, 125 whopping miles. While it may be unrealistic for you to run this distance with your husky, you will need to learn to love running. Ten miles isn’t much, in fact, it’s good for you! Both you and your Husky can greatly benefit from a good run. Now you have no excuse to put off exercising because your dog needs it too. And who can say no to an adorable Siberian Husky? Definitely not you.

 

Lead your husky, don’t let your husky lead you

As we’ve mentioned earlier, Siberian Huskies are working dogs that can run a great distance. They’re strong enough to pull a sled across the Arctic to get food and other supplies from one town to another. Think Balto. If you haven’t watched that movie then you really should. That being said, they’re pretty strong and can easily drag you along when you’re holding their leashes. From a young age, teach your Huskies walking manners because you’re a person, not a sled. Besides, training a Husky is fairly easy as long as you’re willing to put the work into it.

 

Husky’s don’t bark, they yell

Contrary to popular belief, Huskies don’t bark much. They’re actually pretty quiet when left alone. But they do like to yell. We’ve seen way too many videos on Facebook and YouTube of Huskies having full blown conversations with their owners, some of them even answer back. And no, that’s not just a thing that happens on the internet. Huskies do in fact yell! According to dogbreedlist.com, “Huskies are called a “talkative” breed because of their wide range of vocalization. Huskies are very good at imitating human sounds. They can make their vocalization sound like words. They are more than willing to talk a lot and they seem to enjoy it when humans join in.”

 

Picky eaters that don’t eat too much

Truth is, Huskies don’t need much to get by. As long as you’re giving them the right food, they can live off not eating much. Back in the old days, it was hard to carry around a food supply for a pack of Huskies pulling the sled. So the sled leader made up for the lack of volume with protein-rich, high-fat, raw meat. This was enough to fuel their energy to get them through the long winter travels. It seems that their modern counter parts have developed the same sort of “refined palate.”

 

Low maintenance

You’d think that their long, bushy coats made Huskies high maintenance, but they’re really not! Unlike other dogs with long hair, their fur rarely ever gets matted. Probably because it sticks out in different directions. The only thing you have to worry about is shedding. Huskies shed A LOT. You can make another Husky out of the fur you collect after brushing them. Before they start their day, take a fine pet brush and get rid of any excess shading to make sure they don’t leave fur all over the house. Oh, and try not to wear black if you’re going somewhere important. People will know that you own a Husky if you do.

 

 

Call of the wild

Sorry to burst your bubble but according to pets.thenest.com, “Although wolf-like in appearance, huskies are no more closely related to wolves than poodles and bulldogs are. While they're all dogs, some huskies may be crossed with wolves, producing a wolf hybrid. That's an entirely different animal from a purebred Siberian husky or its cousin, the Alaskan Malamute.” Your Husky may look more wolf like that your Chihuahua, but in truth they share the same amount of wolf DNA.

 

One-of-a-kind

All dogs are created equal, but there’s just something about Huskies that make them one-of-a-kind. They’re goofy, they love to play, and their rigid expression are in no way a match for their quirky personalities. Huskies provide plenty of comic relief to stressful situations and they’re always down to party! Sharing your life with a husky means a lot of fun and plenty of commitment, but it’s all worth it in the end.

 

Acquired taste

Huskies aren’t an acquired taste, you are. And all your other pets. It takes a while for Huskies to learn to trust their surroundings. In comes from their predatory nature. But once they learn that you’re not a threat, they will stick to you with blind loyalty. Don’t feel bad about your Husky not warming up to you right away, it’s normal. They’re like that with everybody. While they are sweet with all people, they won’t exactly be exposing their bellies on the first day. Give them time, they like doing things at their own pace.

 

Some people like a clean slate for the beginning of the new year and other want a new dog! Are you considering adopting a Husky? Don’t let these things discourage you, they’re all good traits! If you’re up for the challenge then by all means go for it!




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